Mini Review: The Chaos of Longing by K.Y. Robinson

thechaosoflongingThe Chaos of Longing by K.Y. Robinson

My Rating: 2.5/5 TARDISes

Series: Standalone

Date Published: May 31st, 2016

Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing

Pages: 118 pages

Source: Netgalley

Links: Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository

Synopsis: The Chaos of Longing is a prose and poetry collection draped in raw honesty, ache, and eroticism. The collection explores trauma, love, heartbreak, and the realizations from it all.

The book is divided into four sections. “Inception” briefly examines formative years and its effects on how one loves. “Longing” reflects on love and sexuality. “Chaos” explores toxic relationships, unrequited love, and heartache. After chaos, there is order with self-love and healing poems in “epiphany”.

Some content may be triggering.

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*I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review*

This is a spoiler-free review.

I always say, poetry is extremely subjective and hard to review, as it will touch each and every reader in a completely unique way. Not every collection or poet will strike the right note with every reader, and this ended up being the case for me with these poems. This was one of those situations where I could appreciate the talent of the author, but the topics and their presentation were just not for me. However, despite my personal experience with these poems, I can easily see how they could deeply impact a reader.

These poems are brave, raw, and powerful. They are incredibly intimate and portray both human weakness and the strength that can come out in one’s most vulnerable moments. The collection as a whole is a journey from naivety, through the torment and battering that life and love can inflict on one’s heart and soul, and ending where healing begins.

Robinson paints a vivid and candid retrospective on self-image and self-discovery—she exposes the full depth of the painful, open wounds that slowly close over time. Not only does she display the torment that one may go through when they let down their defenses in favor of passion, but also the triumph of courage gained from accepting who we are and the decisions we make. Ultimately, this collection is not only her story, but also a stark and uninhibited portrait of what it is like to be human.

Even though I didn’t quite connect with this particular work and the subject matter, I still found the beauty in Robinson’s writing and delicate crafting of each poem. She clearly poured so much heart and meaning into every word, and truly bared herself and her personal emotional journey through this collection. I admire her candor and her nerve, opening herself up in this manner—and I very much believe that her writing can and will reach and impact plenty of readers.

2.5 TARDISes

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Mini Review: Send by Domenico Capilongo

sendSend by Domenico Capilongo

My Rating: 2.5/5 TARDISes

Series: Standalone

Date Published: April 1st, 2017

Publisher: Guernica Editions

Pages: 110 pages

Source: Netgalley

Links: Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository

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*I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review*

This is a spoiler-free review.

Send is a collection of poetry that focuses on the many different forms of communication that we have in our world today. With the plethora ways we have to access each other these days, I felt like this would be very interesting and topical book of poems. But, though there were a few poems that did stand out to me, overall, I did not end up enjoying this particular collection. Every poet has their own style, and there is so much room for creativity in this form of writing. Because of this, not every style is going to click with every reader, and Capilongo’s style was just not for me.

Each poem in this collection is relatively short, which I found to be a good reflection of our condensed communications with one another over text, Twitter, Facebook, and other social media. Many are written using stream of consciousness, which is yet another hallmark of communication these days.

Capilongo touches on the jumble of thoughts we throw out into cyberspace, sometimes in a rather narcissistic way, and how technology can completely take over every action, every moment of our lives. He tells a relatable story in a very abstract format. And while all of this was quite entertaining, the majority of this collection just fell a bit flat for me. Personally, I found that a large portion of this poetry felt more like a random jumble of words, rather than a meaningful message. These poems did not click with me—they felt far too disjointed and at times unintelligible.

2.5 TARDISes

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